Welcome Guest!
Create an Account
login email:
password:
site searchwhere to watchcontact usabout usadvertise with ushelp
Message Board

BobcatAttack.com Message Board
Ohio Football
Topic:  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help

Topic:  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
Author
Message
spongeBOB CATpants
General User



Member Since: 8/16/2016
Post Count: 959

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 10:28:01 AM 
I remember a segment on Columbus 97.1 the fan where they had this same discussion and opinions when Gene Smith sent out the same messaging to fans. Basically told buckeye nation that if they want to beat Michigan then paying for tickets is not enough, you must cut a check to Cardale Jones + co. It almost reminds me of political campaigns that use fear mongering to brainwash.

If Columbus media pushed back against this type of messaging, you know its bad. This is why I'm assuming most donations (or at least the biggest donations) are coming via businesses and not your average joes but as far as I know, there's no way to see that information.
Back to Top
  
Kevin Finnegan
General User

Member Since: 2/4/2005
Location: Rockton, IL
Post Count: 1,098

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 11:18:07 AM 
Does anybody know how coaches go about getting money from the collective? Who chooses how much goes to each sport? Who is allocating sums to football and basketball and then deciding if there's anything left over for any other sports?
Back to Top
  
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame
General User

Member Since: 7/30/2010
Post Count: 3,369

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 11:33:30 AM 
This is all likely to end up a moot point once the P5 conferences finish their settlement agreements.

It looks like the path the P5 and NCAA is headed down is one in which there's a revenue share agreement with athletes but that they are not employees. That's a bit of a tight rope, and they definitely haven't heard the last of the athletes as employees issue, but it's a decent short-term solution given the mess the NCAA created here.

It'll be interesting to see what becomes of the NIL Collectives post-revenue sharing. I suspect they'll still exist, but the more schools are enabled to pay players directly, the more players will opt for that path. There's a very, very big difference between a player being offered $1 million dollars in marketing potential and cash.
Back to Top
  
Andrew Ruck
General User



Member Since: 12/22/2004
Location: Columbus, OH
Post Count: 4,766

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 3:02:36 PM 
OhioBobcat wrote:
The idea behind the NIL drive was to allow student athletes to profit from their names, image and likeness (NIL), which made sense. Let them sign autographs, do commercials, sell their jerseys, etc., and make money off of it. Fair enough, I was on board with that. But then, these cute little collectives started popping up where people literally contribute funds towards them that essentially result in paying and buying players. Schools can literally go shopping for players through these collectives.


This sums up everything for a lot of us. We got duped big time. The slippery slope wins again.


Andrew Ruck
B.B.A. 2003

Back to Top
  
Alan Swank
General User

Member Since: 12/11/2004
Location: Athens, OH
Post Count: 7,060

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 4:28:14 PM 
Andrew Ruck wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
The idea behind the NIL drive was to allow student athletes to profit from their names, image and likeness (NIL), which made sense. Let them sign autographs, do commercials, sell their jerseys, etc., and make money off of it. Fair enough, I was on board with that. But then, these cute little collectives started popping up where people literally contribute funds towards them that essentially result in paying and buying players. Schools can literally go shopping for players through these collectives.


This sums up everything for a lot of us. We got duped big time. The slippery slope wins again.


You only got duped if you gave.

Back to Top
  
Bobcat1996
General User

Member Since: 1/2/2017
Post Count: 814

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 7:42:00 PM 
Andrew Ruck wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
The idea behind the NIL drive was to allow student athletes to profit from their names, image and likeness (NIL), which made sense. Let them sign autographs, do commercials, sell their jerseys, etc., and make money off of it. Fair enough, I was on board with that. But then, these cute little collectives started popping up where people literally contribute funds towards them that essentially result in paying and buying players. Schools can literally go shopping for players through these collectives.


This sums up everything for a lot of us. We got duped big time. The slippery slope wins again.


How many of you watch Bobcat basketball and football in person every opportunity you get? How many of you complain about every loss? Did you enjoy watching Creighton transfer Shereef Mitchell help Ohio win basketball games? Would the Bobcats have won as many games in basketball if Mitchell transferred to another school? We all know the answer to that question. Mitchell got NIL cash to come to Athens from Creighton. He is not the only basketball player to get paid. He helped Ohio win basketball games. Why do you think Indiana went after Bobcat QB Kurtis Rourke and is giving him a bunch of NIL cash? Why did Bobcat TE Will Kacmarek head to Ohio State? These players are now getting opportunities to make money. Many of us don't like what is going on in college sports today. However, it is the rules these coaches have been forced to play with. Attend one of these Bobcat caravans and talk to the coaches. More than likely, they will tell you that in order to stay competitive in the conference they need NIL money to bring in and keep some of these athletes. You have a choice. A person does not need to contribute to the NIL collective, however, I'm 100% certain many will be criticizing when Ohio loses games. Until the powers that be change the way college athletics are operating, we are unfortunately stuck with this NIL set up.

Last Edited: 5/23/2024 7:43:48 PM by Bobcat1996

Back to Top
  
BillyTheCat
General User

Member Since: 10/6/2012
Post Count: 9,616

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 10:56:23 PM 
Kevin Finnegan wrote:
Does anybody know how coaches go about getting money from the collective? Who chooses how much goes to each sport? Who is allocating sums to football and basketball and then deciding if there's anything left over for any other sports?


Collective bases that like the ICA does on budget funding, and number of athletes. I am sure you can eat mark money. They would just assume you don’t.
Back to Top
  
BillyTheCat
General User

Member Since: 10/6/2012
Post Count: 9,616

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 10:58:17 PM 
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
This is all likely to end up a moot point once the P5 conferences finish their settlement agreements.

It looks like the path the P5 and NCAA is headed down is one in which there's a revenue share agreement with athletes but that they are not employees. That's a bit of a tight rope, and they definitely haven't heard the last of the athletes as employees issue, but it's a decent short-term solution given the mess the NCAA created here.

It'll be interesting to see what becomes of the NIL Collectives post-revenue sharing. I suspect they'll still exist, but the more schools are enabled to pay players directly, the more players will opt for that path. There's a very, very big difference between a player being offered $1 million dollars in marketing potential and cash.


Seriously? As long as NIl is legal, players will take their revenue sharing and their NIL money will be a separate cash cow, it’s not going to be one or the other.
Back to Top
  
BillyTheCat
General User

Member Since: 10/6/2012
Post Count: 9,616

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 10:59:46 PM 
Alan Swank wrote:
Andrew Ruck wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
The idea behind the NIL drive was to allow student athletes to profit from their names, image and likeness (NIL), which made sense. Let them sign autographs, do commercials, sell their jerseys, etc., and make money off of it. Fair enough, I was on board with that. But then, these cute little collectives started popping up where people literally contribute funds towards them that essentially result in paying and buying players. Schools can literally go shopping for players through these collectives.


This sums up everything for a lot of us. We got duped big time. The slippery slope wins again.


You only got duped if you gave.



No one got duped, revenue sharing isn’t going to eliminate NIL
Back to Top
  
BillyTheCat
General User

Member Since: 10/6/2012
Post Count: 9,616

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/23/2024 11:02:09 PM 
Bobcat1996 wrote:
Andrew Ruck wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
The idea behind the NIL drive was to allow student athletes to profit from their names, image and likeness (NIL), which made sense. Let them sign autographs, do commercials, sell their jerseys, etc., and make money off of it. Fair enough, I was on board with that. But then, these cute little collectives started popping up where people literally contribute funds towards them that essentially result in paying and buying players. Schools can literally go shopping for players through these collectives.


This sums up everything for a lot of us. We got duped big time. The slippery slope wins again.


How many of you watch Bobcat basketball and football in person every opportunity you get? How many of you complain about every loss? Did you enjoy watching Creighton transfer Shereef Mitchell help Ohio win basketball games? Would the Bobcats have won as many games in basketball if Mitchell transferred to another school? We all know the answer to that question. Mitchell got NIL cash to come to Athens from Creighton. He is not the only basketball player to get paid. He helped Ohio win basketball games. Why do you think Indiana went after Bobcat QB Kurtis Rourke and is giving him a bunch of NIL cash? Why did Bobcat TE Will Kacmarek head to Ohio State? These players are now getting opportunities to make money. Many of us don't like what is going on in college sports today. However, it is the rules these coaches have been forced to play with. Attend one of these Bobcat caravans and talk to the coaches. More than likely, they will tell you that in order to stay competitive in the conference they need NIL money to bring in and keep some of these athletes. You have a choice. A person does not need to contribute to the NIL collective, however, I'm 100% certain many will be criticizing when Ohio loses games. Until the powers that be change the way college athletics are operating, we are unfortunately stuck with this NIL set up.


This NIL set up is brought to you by state legislatures, no settlement for revenue sharing does anything to change that.
Back to Top
  
MonroeClassmate
General User

Member Since: 8/31/2010
Post Count: 2,017

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/24/2024 10:33:17 AM 
The player expense/compensation paid is a good place for some of the 70,000 new IRS agents to pursue added revenue for the USofA. Get the transfer from a sheltered institution to the hands of new young tax payers.

Slip them $$$ or pay them will all be taxable income with all the state, local, FICA and Medicare taxes being deducted. The new deficit reduction act.
Back to Top
  
Rufusbobcat94
General User

Member Since: 6/13/2018
Post Count: 349

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 11:02:17 AM 
That would be interesting to know how much Rourke got/will get at Indiana.

Last Edited: 5/27/2024 11:02:44 AM by Rufusbobcat94

Back to Top
  
SBH
General User

Member Since: 12/20/2004
Post Count: 3,801

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 11:38:29 AM 
$450K
Back to Top
  
colobobcat66
General User

Member Since: 9/1/2006
Location: Watching the bobcats run outside my window., CO
Post Count: 4,206

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 2:28:19 PM 
SBH wrote:
$450K


Divided by 2
Back to Top
  
OhioBobcat
General User

Member Since: 1/20/2006
Post Count: 1,566

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 3:27:42 PM 
Alan Swank wrote:
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:


The money is far from being "the same." The NIL collectives are a completely different animal than earmarked donations to athletic department projects.

There's always been a facilities race in college athletics, and it's been accelerated in the last 20 years (new buildings, new equipment, improved training facilities, academic centers, etc). The money that goes into those projects certainly has a purpose to help attract student athletes to a school. But their main purpose is to help them train and improve the students who are there while at that school. The money goes/went to a physical structure like a building, a weight room and equipment that the entire team/programs can use while affiliated with their respective programs. You can walk into Ohio's stadium tower, weight room, indoor facility or endzone facility today, and you can came back in 10, 20 or 30 years, and they'll still be standing (and will most likely have been renovated and improved with even more funds through donations). They were investments that were made that aided the construction of those facilities. Those donations went towards a project, they did not go to a student athlete for them to use the funds as they see fit. And the purpose of those donations ultimately benefits the student athletes as they become the beneficiaries, they reap the rewards from being able to utilize the projects those donations help create. It's a brick-and-mortar type of an investment that benefits many. It has a defined use and purpose.

The NIL collectives, however, are totally different. It allows people to give money to the collective that ultimately will result in a payout to players for "services." Don't even get me started on that part. But the NIL collectives are literally used to compensate players directly. Pay them to stay at a school, pay them to leave their school for another. It's taking your money, giving it to the collective, and it eventually ending up in the players' bank accounts to do whatever they want with it. Buy a new car, go on a shopping spree, drink it away on Court Street, save it, invest it, whatever. This is clearly different than making donations. Yes, it all concerns money, but it's apples and oranges as to where the money goes and how it is actually used.


You're describing how the money's being used, not where it came from.

The NIL donor base is basically exactly the same as the school's donor base for facilities and the like. These NIL collectives aren't magically creating millions of dollars in net new donations. The money's the same, it's now spent differently.


As a college development officer I can say you're spot on. At an individual donor level, the alum who gives to athletics (most donors are alums) is now torn between giving to a ransom pool or the athletics general fund. For example, Bobcat Club dollars going into the athletics general fund get you three priority points. If the donation is sport specific, it's one point per dollar. Does a donor do that or pay into a ransom pool. From what I'm reading in this thread, most folks are saying you can keep the hostage.


Very good examples, but what you failed to mention is the main component/layer to all of this. REMEMBER - NIL collectives are independent from the colleges and universities (for the time being) - despite the fact that they turn around and feed right into them. Donations (to the university) have long been abled to be earmarked for a specific target area (a general fund, a specific sport, a specific project, etc). But with the introduction of NIL collectives, universities aren't wanting their long-time and/or current donors to stop sending money to the school and instead send it towards the collectives (no, no, no...). They want donors to continue making their contributions AND are now being lobbied/asked (either directly or indirectly) to send additional money to NIL collectives (such as our example of a plea from coach). Make no mistake here - the objective here isn't for you to decide where to send your money, the objective to get you to send more money and to different and separate platforms. Hence my point about the money not being the same. They don't want you to put $1,000 in the right hand (university donations) and then move that $1,000 to the left hand instead (NIL collectives). They want to you put $1,000 into BOTH hands for both parties and platforms to use.
Back to Top
  
Alan Swank
General User

Member Since: 12/11/2004
Location: Athens, OH
Post Count: 7,060

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 6:28:22 PM 
OhioBobcat wrote:
Alan Swank wrote:
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:


The money is far from being "the same." The NIL collectives are a completely different animal than earmarked donations to athletic department projects.

There's always been a facilities race in college athletics, and it's been accelerated in the last 20 years (new buildings, new equipment, improved training facilities, academic centers, etc). The money that goes into those projects certainly has a purpose to help attract student athletes to a school. But their main purpose is to help them train and improve the students who are there while at that school. The money goes/went to a physical structure like a building, a weight room and equipment that the entire team/programs can use while affiliated with their respective programs. You can walk into Ohio's stadium tower, weight room, indoor facility or endzone facility today, and you can came back in 10, 20 or 30 years, and they'll still be standing (and will most likely have been renovated and improved with even more funds through donations). They were investments that were made that aided the construction of those facilities. Those donations went towards a project, they did not go to a student athlete for them to use the funds as they see fit. And the purpose of those donations ultimately benefits the student athletes as they become the beneficiaries, they reap the rewards from being able to utilize the projects those donations help create. It's a brick-and-mortar type of an investment that benefits many. It has a defined use and purpose.

The NIL collectives, however, are totally different. It allows people to give money to the collective that ultimately will result in a payout to players for "services." Don't even get me started on that part. But the NIL collectives are literally used to compensate players directly. Pay them to stay at a school, pay them to leave their school for another. It's taking your money, giving it to the collective, and it eventually ending up in the players' bank accounts to do whatever they want with it. Buy a new car, go on a shopping spree, drink it away on Court Street, save it, invest it, whatever. This is clearly different than making donations. Yes, it all concerns money, but it's apples and oranges as to where the money goes and how it is actually used.


You're describing how the money's being used, not where it came from.

The NIL donor base is basically exactly the same as the school's donor base for facilities and the like. These NIL collectives aren't magically creating millions of dollars in net new donations. The money's the same, it's now spent differently.


As a college development officer I can say you're spot on. At an individual donor level, the alum who gives to athletics (most donors are alums) is now torn between giving to a ransom pool or the athletics general fund. For example, Bobcat Club dollars going into the athletics general fund get you three priority points. If the donation is sport specific, it's one point per dollar. Does a donor do that or pay into a ransom pool. From what I'm reading in this thread, most folks are saying you can keep the hostage.


Very good examples, but what you failed to mention is the main component/layer to all of this. REMEMBER - NIL collectives are independent from the colleges and universities (for the time being) - despite the fact that they turn around and feed right into them. Donations (to the university) have long been abled to be earmarked for a specific target area (a general fund, a specific sport, a specific project, etc). But with the introduction of NIL collectives, universities aren't wanting their long-time and/or current donors to stop sending money to the school and instead send it towards the collectives (no, no, no...). They want donors to continue making their contributions AND are now being lobbied/asked (either directly or indirectly) to send additional money to NIL collectives (such as our example of a plea from coach). Make no mistake here - the objective here isn't for you to decide where to send your money, the objective to get you to send more money and to different and separate platforms. Hence my point about the money not being the same. They don't want you to put $1,000 in the right hand (university donations) and then move that $1,000 to the left hand instead (NIL collectives). They want to you put $1,000 into BOTH hands for both parties and platforms to use.


While all of that is true, only 8% of college alumni donate to their alma maters. The schools that have high rates of giving are elite private schools concentrated in the northeast. As for giving, there are two categories of giving - budget enhancing nd budget relieving. A gift to program A may not increase their budget, it may simply replace budgeted money for that program. I'd hate to be a development officer at a big time sports school right now trying to raise money for general scholarships and student programs.

Back to Top
  
OhioBobcat
General User

Member Since: 1/20/2006
Post Count: 1,566

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 7:58:05 PM 
Alan Swank wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
Alan Swank wrote:
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:


The money is far from being "the same." The NIL collectives are a completely different animal than earmarked donations to athletic department projects.

There's always been a facilities race in college athletics, and it's been accelerated in the last 20 years (new buildings, new equipment, improved training facilities, academic centers, etc). The money that goes into those projects certainly has a purpose to help attract student athletes to a school. But their main purpose is to help them train and improve the students who are there while at that school. The money goes/went to a physical structure like a building, a weight room and equipment that the entire team/programs can use while affiliated with their respective programs. You can walk into Ohio's stadium tower, weight room, indoor facility or endzone facility today, and you can came back in 10, 20 or 30 years, and they'll still be standing (and will most likely have been renovated and improved with even more funds through donations). They were investments that were made that aided the construction of those facilities. Those donations went towards a project, they did not go to a student athlete for them to use the funds as they see fit. And the purpose of those donations ultimately benefits the student athletes as they become the beneficiaries, they reap the rewards from being able to utilize the projects those donations help create. It's a brick-and-mortar type of an investment that benefits many. It has a defined use and purpose.

The NIL collectives, however, are totally different. It allows people to give money to the collective that ultimately will result in a payout to players for "services." Don't even get me started on that part. But the NIL collectives are literally used to compensate players directly. Pay them to stay at a school, pay them to leave their school for another. It's taking your money, giving it to the collective, and it eventually ending up in the players' bank accounts to do whatever they want with it. Buy a new car, go on a shopping spree, drink it away on Court Street, save it, invest it, whatever. This is clearly different than making donations. Yes, it all concerns money, but it's apples and oranges as to where the money goes and how it is actually used.


You're describing how the money's being used, not where it came from.

The NIL donor base is basically exactly the same as the school's donor base for facilities and the like. These NIL collectives aren't magically creating millions of dollars in net new donations. The money's the same, it's now spent differently.


As a college development officer I can say you're spot on. At an individual donor level, the alum who gives to athletics (most donors are alums) is now torn between giving to a ransom pool or the athletics general fund. For example, Bobcat Club dollars going into the athletics general fund get you three priority points. If the donation is sport specific, it's one point per dollar. Does a donor do that or pay into a ransom pool. From what I'm reading in this thread, most folks are saying you can keep the hostage.


Very good examples, but what you failed to mention is the main component/layer to all of this. REMEMBER - NIL collectives are independent from the colleges and universities (for the time being) - despite the fact that they turn around and feed right into them. Donations (to the university) have long been abled to be earmarked for a specific target area (a general fund, a specific sport, a specific project, etc). But with the introduction of NIL collectives, universities aren't wanting their long-time and/or current donors to stop sending money to the school and instead send it towards the collectives (no, no, no...). They want donors to continue making their contributions AND are now being lobbied/asked (either directly or indirectly) to send additional money to NIL collectives (such as our example of a plea from coach). Make no mistake here - the objective here isn't for you to decide where to send your money, the objective to get you to send more money and to different and separate platforms. Hence my point about the money not being the same. They don't want you to put $1,000 in the right hand (university donations) and then move that $1,000 to the left hand instead (NIL collectives). They want to you put $1,000 into BOTH hands for both parties and platforms to use.


While all of that is true, only 8% of college alumni donate to their alma maters.



Keep in mind, the percentage of alums who donate can be very misleading when it comes to financial contribution results. Every institution wants as many alums to donate as possible to not only drive up the number of alums who offer support through giving, but to of course, reach their contribution goals. They will tell you that any gift, no matter how big or small, counts and matters. And while true, they do and can, but they do so in varying degrees. You could have an extraordinary high number of alums donate a modest amount that would drive up the percentage of collectable donated figures. But the reality is, they’re really in search of that small percentage of “Lead Donors” who can make lead gift donations to contribute (quality over quantity). These are the heavy-hitters. They are the difference makers. A single Lead Donor gift often exceeds the total combined contribution of others donations by a landslide. These are the game-changing donors who often have their names on buildings, scholarships named after them, etc. They are the people who can help get things done. These are and have always been the target groups to raise money and support through their donations and giving. And they are now also a pivotal and vital part (or sought after part) of the arms race through collectives. It’s getting the deep-pocket donors to give and keep giving that drives much of these topics we’re discussing.

Back to Top
  
Alan Swank
General User

Member Since: 12/11/2004
Location: Athens, OH
Post Count: 7,060

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/27/2024 10:24:13 PM 
OhioBobcat wrote:
Alan Swank wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
Alan Swank wrote:
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:


The money is far from being "the same." The NIL collectives are a completely different animal than earmarked donations to athletic department projects.

There's always been a facilities race in college athletics, and it's been accelerated in the last 20 years (new buildings, new equipment, improved training facilities, academic centers, etc). The money that goes into those projects certainly has a purpose to help attract student athletes to a school. But their main purpose is to help them train and improve the students who are there while at that school. The money goes/went to a physical structure like a building, a weight room and equipment that the entire team/programs can use while affiliated with their respective programs. You can walk into Ohio's stadium tower, weight room, indoor facility or endzone facility today, and you can came back in 10, 20 or 30 years, and they'll still be standing (and will most likely have been renovated and improved with even more funds through donations). They were investments that were made that aided the construction of those facilities. Those donations went towards a project, they did not go to a student athlete for them to use the funds as they see fit. And the purpose of those donations ultimately benefits the student athletes as they become the beneficiaries, they reap the rewards from being able to utilize the projects those donations help create. It's a brick-and-mortar type of an investment that benefits many. It has a defined use and purpose.

The NIL collectives, however, are totally different. It allows people to give money to the collective that ultimately will result in a payout to players for "services." Don't even get me started on that part. But the NIL collectives are literally used to compensate players directly. Pay them to stay at a school, pay them to leave their school for another. It's taking your money, giving it to the collective, and it eventually ending up in the players' bank accounts to do whatever they want with it. Buy a new car, go on a shopping spree, drink it away on Court Street, save it, invest it, whatever. This is clearly different than making donations. Yes, it all concerns money, but it's apples and oranges as to where the money goes and how it is actually used.


You're describing how the money's being used, not where it came from.

The NIL donor base is basically exactly the same as the school's donor base for facilities and the like. These NIL collectives aren't magically creating millions of dollars in net new donations. The money's the same, it's now spent differently.


As a college development officer I can say you're spot on. At an individual donor level, the alum who gives to athletics (most donors are alums) is now torn between giving to a ransom pool or the athletics general fund. For example, Bobcat Club dollars going into the athletics general fund get you three priority points. If the donation is sport specific, it's one point per dollar. Does a donor do that or pay into a ransom pool. From what I'm reading in this thread, most folks are saying you can keep the hostage.


Very good examples, but what you failed to mention is the main component/layer to all of this. REMEMBER - NIL collectives are independent from the colleges and universities (for the time being) - despite the fact that they turn around and feed right into them. Donations (to the university) have long been abled to be earmarked for a specific target area (a general fund, a specific sport, a specific project, etc). But with the introduction of NIL collectives, universities aren't wanting their long-time and/or current donors to stop sending money to the school and instead send it towards the collectives (no, no, no...). They want donors to continue making their contributions AND are now being lobbied/asked (either directly or indirectly) to send additional money to NIL collectives (such as our example of a plea from coach). Make no mistake here - the objective here isn't for you to decide where to send your money, the objective to get you to send more money and to different and separate platforms. Hence my point about the money not being the same. They don't want you to put $1,000 in the right hand (university donations) and then move that $1,000 to the left hand instead (NIL collectives). They want to you put $1,000 into BOTH hands for both parties and platforms to use.


While all of that is true, only 8% of college alumni donate to their alma maters.



Keep in mind, the percentage of alums who donate can be very misleading when it comes to financial contribution results. Every institution wants as many alums to donate as possible to not only drive up the number of alums who offer support through giving, but to of course, reach their contribution goals. They will tell you that any gift, no matter how big or small, counts and matters. And while true, they do and can, but they do so in varying degrees. You could have an extraordinary high number of alums donate a modest amount that would drive up the percentage of collectable donated figures. But the reality is, they’re really in search of that small percentage of “Lead Donors” who can make lead gift donations to contribute (quality over quantity). These are the heavy-hitters. They are the difference makers. A single Lead Donor gift often exceeds the total combined contribution of others donations by a landslide. These are the game-changing donors who often have their names on buildings, scholarships named after them, etc. They are the people who can help get things done. These are and have always been the target groups to raise money and support through their donations and giving. And they are now also a pivotal and vital part (or sought after part) of the arms race through collectives. It’s getting the deep-pocket donors to give and keep giving that drives much of these topics we’re discussing.



For the sake of the example, $100,000 donors are nice but in the long run, I'd much rather have 10 $10,000 donors one year than one $100,000 donor. Over time, the former will most likely net more gifts than the latter.
Back to Top
  
BillyTheCat
General User

Member Since: 10/6/2012
Post Count: 9,616

Status: Offline

  Message Not Read  RE: NIL: Albin's Cry For Help
   Posted: 5/29/2024 6:19:59 PM 
Alan Swank wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:
Alan Swank wrote:
Bobcat Love's Sense of Shame wrote:
OhioBobcat wrote:


The money is far from being "the same." The NIL collectives are a completely different animal than earmarked donations to athletic department projects.

There's always been a facilities race in college athletics, and it's been accelerated in the last 20 years (new buildings, new equipment, improved training facilities, academic centers, etc). The money that goes into those projects certainly has a purpose to help attract student athletes to a school. But their main purpose is to help them train and improve the students who are there while at that school. The money goes/went to a physical structure like a building, a weight room and equipment that the entire team/programs can use while affiliated with their respective programs. You can walk into Ohio's stadium tower, weight room, indoor facility or endzone facility today, and you can came back in 10, 20 or 30 years, and they'll still be standing (and will most likely have been renovated and improved with even more funds through donations). They were investments that were made that aided the construction of those facilities. Those donations went towards a project, they did not go to a student athlete for them to use the funds as they see fit. And the purpose of those donations ultimately benefits the student athletes as they become the beneficiaries, they reap the rewards from being able to utilize the projects those donations help create. It's a brick-and-mortar type of an investment that benefits many. It has a defined use and purpose.

The NIL collectives, however, are totally different. It allows people to give money to the collective that ultimately will result in a payout to players for "services." Don't even get me started on that part. But the NIL collectives are literally used to compensate players directly. Pay them to stay at a school, pay them to leave their school for another. It's taking your money, giving it to the collective, and it eventually ending up in the players' bank accounts to do whatever they want with it. Buy a new car, go on a shopping spree, drink it away on Court Street, save it, invest it, whatever. This is clearly different than making donations. Yes, it all concerns money, but it's apples and oranges as to where the money goes and how it is actually used.


You're describing how the money's being used, not where it came from.

The NIL donor base is basically exactly the same as the school's donor base for facilities and the like. These NIL collectives aren't magically creating millions of dollars in net new donations. The money's the same, it's now spent differently.


As a college development officer I can say you're spot on. At an individual donor level, the alum who gives to athletics (most donors are alums) is now torn between giving to a ransom pool or the athletics general fund. For example, Bobcat Club dollars going into the athletics general fund get you three priority points. If the donation is sport specific, it's one point per dollar. Does a donor do that or pay into a ransom pool. From what I'm reading in this thread, most folks are saying you can keep the hostage.


Very good examples, but what you failed to mention is the main component/layer to all of this. REMEMBER - NIL collectives are independent from the colleges and universities (for the time being) - despite the fact that they turn around and feed right into them. Donations (to the university) have long been abled to be earmarked for a specific target area (a general fund, a specific sport, a specific project, etc). But with the introduction of NIL collectives, universities aren't wanting their long-time and/or current donors to stop sending money to the school and instead send it towards the collectives (no, no, no...). They want donors to continue making their contributions AND are now being lobbied/asked (either directly or indirectly) to send additional money to NIL collectives (such as our example of a plea from coach). Make no mistake here - the objective here isn't for you to decide where to send your money, the objective to get you to send more money and to different and separate platforms. Hence my point about the money not being the same. They don't want you to put $1,000 in the right hand (university donations) and then move that $1,000 to the left hand instead (NIL collectives). They want to you put $1,000 into BOTH hands for both parties and platforms to use.


While all of that is true, only 8% of college alumni donate to their alma maters. The schools that have high rates of giving are elite private schools concentrated in the northeast. As for giving, there are two categories of giving - budget enhancing nd budget relieving. A gift to program A may not increase their budget, it may simply replace budgeted money for that program. I'd hate to be a development officer at a big time sports school right now trying to raise money for general scholarships and student programs.




Alan, this is exactly why I only give to restricted projects.
Back to Top
  
Showing Replies:  26 - 44  of 44 Posts
Jump to Page:  < Previous    1 | 2
View Other 'Ohio Football' Topics
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             







Copyright ©2024 BobcatAttack.com. All rights reserved.  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Use
Partner of USA TODAY Sports Digital Properties